Wedding Invitation Etiquette Checklist

Wedding Invitation Etiquette Checklist

Your wedding invitation sets the tone for your celebration and communicates so much more. Before you send them, be sure you use this 6-step checklist so you don’t end up making any mistakes, or heaven forbid, hurting the feelings of your friends and family. After all, invitations are all about making people feel special and welcome, and here’s how to do it.

#1 Sending a Save the Date six months ahead of your wedding day helps your guests make plans. Once they’re aware of your celebration, your wedding invitations should be sent eight weeks in advance, or 12 weeks prior if your guests will be traveling from out of town.

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Photographed by Jen Huang Photography - Los Angeles, California photographers

#2 Be specific about the location, date, and time. People will naturally show up early for your wedding, so there is no need to suggest that they do. If your wedding will be at a hotel like the Four Seasons that may have two locations in the same city, or at a venue off the beaten path, then include the full address with zip code and consider adding a map to help your guests arrive easily.

hand-made-paper-invitation-charcoal-envelope-pink-accents-gold-seal-worlds-best-wedding-photos-david-bastianoni-italy-wedding-photographers
Photographed by David Bastianon Studio - Italy photographers

#3 Don’t forget your RSVP card with instructions to respond by a date 2 to 3 weeks before your wedding day, and be sure your return envelope has a stamp on it. You’ll want to make it seamless for your guests to get back to you.

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Photographed by M. Hart Photo - Los Angeles, California

#4 Be specific about who is invited. If you have friends with children and you want everyone there, spell out all of their names. If kids aren’t coming, write your friends full names and leave the kids out. 

Most people will expect to arrive with a guest. If your friend or family member is in a committed relationship, write out the name of their guest to make both of them feel welcome. If they’re single, just write their name “and guest”. 

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Photographed by Benj Haisch Photography - Seattle, Washington photorgraphers
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Photographed by ModernMade Weddings - Florida photographers
flat-lay-with-autumn-leaves-stationery-and-rings-jen-huang
Photographed by Jen Huang Photography - Los Angeles, California photographers

#5 Be mindful about how the invitation is worded. If your parents or other hosts are paying for all or a substantial portion of your wedding expenses it is gracious to have the invitation come from all of you. If just the two are the hosting, you can be as casual as you want to be, and you might find that using your full names or first names only fits your personal style. 

classic-linen-invitations-with-grey-calligraphy-john-and-joseph-wedding-montage-hotel-laguna-101-los-angeles-photographers
Photographed by John and Joseph - Los Angeles, California photographers
flat-lay-of-handmade-stationery-with-rings-jen-huang
Photographed by Jen Huang Photography - Los Angeles, California photographers
worlds-best-wedding-photos-ivory-invitations-gold-lettering-jen-huang-los-angeles-wedding-photographer
Photographed by Jen Huang Photography - Los Angeles, California photographers

#6 Last but not least, one etiquette faux pas that you want to avoid is adding your registry information on your invitation or telling guests not to bring gifts. Instead, direct them to your website where they can find more details about your wedding.

Looking for more gorgeous wedding ideas? Check out our Details and Decor Gallery and find gorgeous invitations, delicious cakes, fabulous floral designs, and more.